Zika Virus Literature - Latest PubMed Articles

Below is an overview of latest articles and publications on Zika virus in PubMed. PubMed is a service of the US National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals.

View also the Zika Open bulletin of the WHO. This Bulletin is an international journal of public health with a special focus on developing countries. Since it was first published in 1948, it has become one of the world’s leading public health journals. In keeping with its mission statement, the peer-reviewed monthly maintains an open-access policy so that the full contents of the journal and its archives are available online free of charge. As the flagship periodical of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Bulletin draws on WHO experts as editorial advisers, reviewers and authors as well as on external collaborators. Anyone can submit a paper to the Bulletin, and no author charges are levied.


  • Persistence and infectivity of Zika virus in semen after returning from endemic areas: Report of 5 cases.
    Persistence and infectivity of Zika virus in semen after returning from endemic areas: Report of 5 cases. [Journal Article]J Clin Virol 2017 Oct 13.:110-115.JCGarcía-Bujalance S, Gutiérrez-Arroyo A, De la Calle F, et al. This case series confirms that Zika virus RNA can be detected in semen up to three months after infection. Viral culture of semen samples shows prolonged infectivity that can lead to sexual transmissio...Publisher Full TextThere are limited data about the persistence and infectivity of Zika virus in semen of symptomatic travelers returning from endemic areas and even less data in asymptomatic cases.We investigated the persistence and infectivity of ZIKA virus in semen in five patients with Zika virus infection returning to Spain from endemic areas.We evaluated the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristic of the five patients. In semen we detected ZIKA virus by PCR, partial sequencing and cell culture. We also performed phylogenetic analysis.We detected Zika virus RNA (Asian lineage) by PCR in semen samples from day 14th to day 96th since the day of illness onset. Semen viral culture was positive for Zika virus in two patients at days of illness 30 and 69 by virus propagation. Phylogenetic analysis strongly suggested male to female sexual transmission in a couple returning from Maldives.This case series confirms that Zika virus RNA can be detected in semen up to three months after infection. Viral culture of semen samples shows prolonged infectivity that can lead to sexual transmission of Zika virus.

  • Useful strategies for the emerging of Zika pandemic and its silent cardiovascular complications.
    Useful strategies for the emerging of Zika pandemic and its silent cardiovascular complications. [Journal Article]Eur J Prev Cardiol 2017 Jan 01.:2047487317737182.EJKrittanawong C Publisher Full Text

  • Emerging infectious disease outbreaks: estimating disease risk in Australian blood donors travelling overseas.
    Emerging infectious disease outbreaks: estimating disease risk in Australian blood donors travelling overseas. [Journal Article]Vox Sang 2017 Oct 19.VSCoghlan A, Hoad VC, Seed CR, et al. The predicted unmitigated likelihood of infection in blood components manufactured from donors travelling to the above-mentioned areas was very low, with the possibility of severe consequences in a tra...Publisher Full TextInternational travel assists spread of infectious pathogens. Australians regularly travel to South-eastern Asia and the isles of the South Pacific, where they may become infected with infectious agents, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses that pose a potential risk to transfusion safety. In Australia, donors are temporarily restricted from donating for fresh component manufacture following travel to many countries, including those in this study. We aimed to estimate the unmitigated transfusion-transmission (TT) risk from donors travelling internationally to areas affected by emerging infectious diseases.We used the European Up-Front Risk Assessment Tool, with travel and notification data, to estimate the TT risk from donors travelling to areas affected by disease outbreaks: Fiji (DENV), Bali (DENV), Phuket (DENV), Indonesia (CHIKV) and French Polynesia (ZIKV).We predict minimal risk from travel, with the annual unmitigated risk of an infected component being released varying from 1 in 1·43 million to <1 in one billion and the risk of severe consequences ranging from 1 in 130 million to <1 in one billion.The predicted unmitigated likelihood of infection in blood components manufactured from donors travelling to the above-mentioned areas was very low, with the possibility of severe consequences in a transfusion recipient even smaller. Given the increasing demand for plasma products in Australia, the current strategy of restricting donors returning from select infectious disease outbreak areas to source plasma collection provides a simple and effective risk management approach.

  • External quality assessment for arbovirus diagnostics in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region, 2013-2016: improving laboratory quality over the years.
    External quality assessment for arbovirus diagnostics in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region, 2013-2016: improving laboratory quality over the years. [Journal Article]Western Pac Surveill Response J 2017 Jul-Sep; 8(3):27-30.WPAbdad MY, Squires RC, Cognat S, et al. Arboviruses continue to pose serious public health threats in the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region. As such, laboratories need to be equipped for their accurate detection. In 2011...Arboviruses continue to pose serious public health threats in the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region. As such, laboratories need to be equipped for their accurate detection. In 2011, to ensure test proficiency, the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific piloted an external quality assessment (EQA) programme for arbovirus diagnostics. By 2016, it had grown into a global programme with participation of 96 laboratories worldwide, including 25 laboratories from 19 countries, territories and areas in the Region. The test performance of the 25 laboratories in the Region in 2016 was high with 23 (92%) reporting correct results in all specimens for dengue and chikungunya viruses. For Zika virus, 18 (72%) of the 25 laboratories reported correct results in all specimens, while seven (28%) demonstrated at least one error. When comparing iterations of this EQA programme in the Region between 2013 and 2016, the number of participating laboratories increased from 18 to 25. The first round only included dengue virus, while the latest round additionally included chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever viruses. Proficiency for molecular detection of dengue virus remained high (83-94%) over the four-year period. The observed proficiency for arbovirus diagnostics between 2013 and 2016 is an indicator of laboratory quality improvement in the Region.

  • Antiviral activity of fenretinide against Zika virus.
    Antiviral activity of fenretinide against Zika virus. [Journal Article]Antiviral Res 2017 Oct 16.ARPitts JD, Li PC, de Wispelaere M, et al. The rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in recent years has highlighted the severe diseases associated with ZIKV infection, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and microcephaly in newborns. Yet, no...Publisher Full TextThe rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in recent years has highlighted the severe diseases associated with ZIKV infection, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and microcephaly in newborns. Yet, no vaccines or antivirals currently exist to prevent or treat ZIKV infection. We and others have previously identified N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (fenretinide or 4-HPR) as an antiviral compound that inhibits dengue virus 2 (DV2) and other flaviviruses by limiting the steady-state accumulation of viral RNA. Here we show that 4-HPR potently inhibits Zika virus (ZIKV) in mammalian cell culture and significantly reduces both serum viremia and brain viral burden in a murine model of ZIKV infection. Consistent with previous observations with dengue virus, this antiviral activity is associated with a significant reduction in the steady-state abundance of viral genomic RNA. We show this reduction is due to a major decrease in the rate of viral RNA synthesis, though not via direct inhibition of the activity of the viral replicase. These results establish 4-HPR's mode of action against DV and ZIKV and, taken with previous clinical trials that established 4-HPR's safety and tolerability, illustrate the potential utility of 4-HPR as an agent for treatment of ZIKV infection.

  • Zika virus: what, where from and where to?
    Zika virus: what, where from and where to? [Journal Article, Review]Pathology 2017 Oct 16.PBasile K, Kok J, Dwyer DE The significance of Zika virus as a clinically significant flavivirus has previously been under-recognised, until extensive outbreaks in Yap in 2007, French Polynesia in 2013 and the Americas since 201...Publisher Full TextThe significance of Zika virus as a clinically significant flavivirus has previously been under-recognised, until extensive outbreaks in Yap in 2007, French Polynesia in 2013 and the Americas since 2015. Although Zika virus infection is commonly asymptomatic or mild, emerging evidence suggests a strong link to microcephaly in babies and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This article reviews the epidemiology, geographic distribution, basic virology, transmission, clinical presentation, potential complications, laboratory diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Zika virus infection. Education on mosquito avoidance measures and vector control efforts currently remain key to reducing risk of transmission, whilst further research is underway to develop antiviral therapies and vaccines.

  • Acute Zika Virus Infection as a Risk Factor for Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Puerto Rico.
    Acute Zika Virus Infection as a Risk Factor for Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Puerto Rico. [Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural]JAMA 2017 10 17; 318(15):1498-1500.JAMADirlikov E, Medina NA, Major CG, et al. Publisher Full Text

  • Virgin Islands' Zika Awareness.
    Virgin Islands' Zika Awareness. [Journal Article]JAMA 2017 Oct 10; 318(14):1315.JAMAPublisher Full Text

  • Update: Interim Guidance for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, October 2017.
    Update: Interim Guidance for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, October 2017. [Journal Article]MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017 Oct 20; 66(41):1089-1099.MMAdebanjo T, Godfred-Cato S, Viens L, et al. CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection (1) in response to recently published updated guidance for health ca...Publisher Full TextCDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection (1) in response to recently published updated guidance for health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure (2), unknown sensitivity and specificity of currently available diagnostic tests for congenital Zika virus infection, and recognition of additional clinical findings associated with congenital Zika virus infection. All infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus exposure* during pregnancy should receive a standard evaluation at birth and at each subsequent well-child visit including a comprehensive physical examination, age-appropriate vision screening and developmental monitoring and screening using validated tools (3-5), and newborn hearing screen at birth, preferably using auditory brainstem response (ABR) methodology (6). Specific guidance for laboratory testing and clinical evaluation are provided for three clinical scenarios in the setting of possible maternal Zika virus exposure: 1) infants with clinical findings consistent with congenital Zika syndrome regardless of maternal testing results, 2) infants without clinical findings consistent with congenital Zika syndrome who were born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection,(†) and 3) infants without clinical findings consistent with congenital Zika syndrome who were born to mothers without laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection. Infants in the first two scenarios should receive further testing and evaluation for Zika virus, whereas for the third group, further testing and clinical evaluation for Zika virus are not recommended. Health care providers should remain alert for abnormal findings (e.g., postnatal-onset microcephaly and eye abnormalities without microcephaly) in infants with possible congenital Zika virus exposure without apparent abnormalities at birth.

  • Modeling neuro-immune interactions during Zika virus infection.
    Modeling neuro-immune interactions during Zika virus infection. [Journal Article]Hum Mol Genet 2017 Oct 17.HMMesci P, Macia A, LaRock CN, et al. Although Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is often asymptomatic, in some cases it can lead to birth defects in newborns or serious neurologic complications in adults. However, little is known about the inte...Publisher Full TextAlthough Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is often asymptomatic, in some cases it can lead to birth defects in newborns or serious neurologic complications in adults. However, little is known about the interplay between immune and neural cells that could contribute to the ZIKV pathology. To understand the mechanisms at play during infection and the antiviral immune response, we focused on neural precursor cells (NPC)-microglia interactions. Our data indicate that human microglia infected with the current circulating Brazilian ZIKV induces a similar pro-inflammatory response found in ZIKV-infected human tissues. Importantly, using our model, we show that microglia interact with ZIKV-infected NPCs and further spread the virus. Finally, we show that Sofosbuvir, an FDA-approved drug for Hepatitis C, blocked viral infection in NPCs and therefore the transmission of the virus from microglia to NPCs. Thus, our model provides a new tool for studying neuro-immune interactions and a platform to test new therapeutic drugs.